Showing posts with label statistics. Show all posts
Showing posts with label statistics. Show all posts

Thursday, 5 November 2020

AUSTRALIA: the 13th Climate of the Nation annual research report was published in October 2020


The Australia Institute released its Climate of the Nation 2020 annual research report this month.


This is the third year the Institute has published this research, the ten years previous to 2018 the survey was published by the Climate Institute.


The quantitative survey was conducted on the YouGov Galaxy Online Omnibus between 14 July and 22 July 2020 and the sample comprised 1,998 Australians aged 18 years and older distributed throughout Australia.


While the qualitative survey comprised of four online focus groups were carried out on 31 August and 1 September 2020. The groups were conducted over Zoom with 21 participants in total. The target group was female swing voters from the federal electorates of Lindsay and Macquarie in NSW, and Lilley and Petrie in Queensland who believe in human caused climate change.



Key Findings In "Climate of the Nation 2020":


80% of Australians think we are already experiencing the impact of climate change


82% of Australians are concerned that climate change will result in more bushfires


83% of Australians support a phase-out of coalfired power stations


79% of Australians rank solar in their top three preferred energy sources


40x is the factor by which Australians overestimate gas industry employment


45x is the factor by which Australians overestimate the oil and gas industry’s contribution to Commonwealth revenue


65% of Australians support the introduction of a levy on Australia’s fossil fuel exports to help pay for climate disasters


65% of Australians think the Australian Government should stop new coal mines


71% think Australia should be a world leader in finding solutions to climate change


72% of Australians believe mining companies should be liable for any land or water contamination caused by fracking


74% of Australians believe governments should plan to phase out coal mining and transition to other industries


68% of Australians support a national target for net zero emissions by 2050


77% of Australians agree tackling climate change creates opportunities in clean energy for new jobs and investment


75% of Australians would consider reducing electricity during times of high demand if they were paid to do so


12% of Australians would prefer Australia’s economic recovery to be primarily powered by gas, compared to 59% who prefer it to be powered by investment in renewables


The Australia Institute: Climate of the Nation 2020 research report by clarencegirl on Scribd

https://www.scribd.com/document/482520496/The-Australia-Institute-Climate-of-the-Nation-2020-research-report


Tuesday, 1 September 2020

Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison's constant pushing to open state borders is not supported by people of voting age according to late August 2020 Newspoll


Young or old, male or female, regardless of political affiliation, it seems residents in the five states surveyed by Newspoll in late August 2020 are firmly on the side of state premiers keeping their borders closed at this stage of the COVID-19 pandemic. 

The Australian, August 2020:

Popular support for Scott Morrison has fallen for the first time since the height of the pandemic as he takes on the states over their refusal to budge on border closures that are holding back the national economic recovery. 


An exclusive Newspoll conducted for The Australians shows the federal political contest tightening between the two major parties, with Labor recovering ground to post its highest primary vote since April and levelling the political playing field with the Coalition. 

Primary vote If the federal election for the house of representatives was held today, which one of the following would you vote for? If uncommitted, to which one of these do you have a leaning? 

One Nation numbers have been broken out from 'Other' from October 25, 2016 Newspoll is conducted by YouGov 

The two major parties are now deadlocked 50:50 on a two-party-preferred basis, marking a four-point turnaround in Labor’s favour over the past three weeks. 

The slide in support for the Prime Minister and the Coalition comes on the back of universal and overwhelming support among voters for the premiers’ right to close borders and restrict entry if and when outbreaks occur. 

A special poll conducted for The Australian shows 80 per cent of Australians support border ­closures if the health situation demands it. The results reveal the difficulty for the federal government as it faces off with the states, with the exception of NSW, which it has been blaming for holding back the national economic recovery.....












Support For State Premiers Over Border Closures Amongst Survey Respondents

South Australia - 92 per cent 

West Australia - 91 per cent 
Queensland - 84 per cent 
New South Wales - 76 per cent 
Victoria - 74 per cent.

Support For Premiers Over Border Closures by Political Party

Labor - 88 per cent
Coalition - 73 per cent
Greens - 88 per cent.

Support For Premiers Over Border Closures by Gender


Men - 78 per cent

Women - 82 per cent

Support For Premiers Over Border Closures by Age Group


18-34 years - 86 per cent

35-49 years - 82 per cent
50-64 years - 79 per cent
65 years & over - 73 per cent

Wednesday, 29 July 2020

More than 60 per cent of businesses in Byron Bay are now relying on JobKeeper to stay afloat


The Sydney Morning Herald, 26 July 2020:

In Byron Bay, sales of a $9.30 large green G-Force smoothie reveal how the COVID-19 wave has dumped on the NSW tourist town. 


In good times, with 2.4 million visitors a year ranging from backpackers to festival goers and others looking for yoga, surf and a healthy lifestyle, Byron can support six smoothie businesses. 

One of them, Sweet Byron, would sell 19 of these large green smoothies a day.   

Then coronavirus hit, forcing the closure of domestic and international borders. Byron's foreign visitors dried up, and its English language schools nearly emptied. 

 COVID-19 caused the cancellation of weddings and events such as the Writers Festival and the Splendour in the Grass misic festival, which usually provide a boost in the slow winter months. 

Ninety per cent of shops, hotels and restaurants in the town closed. When they reopened before school holidays, the streets were empty and Sweet Byron was lucky if it sold two Gforce Smoothies. 

Those students and backpackers who had remained headed north when the Queensland border re-opened earlier this month. 

More than 60 per cent of businesses in Byron are now relying on JobKeeper to stay afloat, according to a map by data analytics company Taylor Fry released last week

This is the most in any local government area in Australia and double the number in capital cities. 

Without JobKeeper Mika Cohen, the owner of the Sweet Byron smoothie shop, said his business wouldn't survive. 

Smoothie sales bounced back during the recent school holidays after coronavirus travel restrictions lifted and the town filled with families who followed the sun north. 

Mr Cohen was back to selling 8 Gforce Smoothies a day, still less than half the number he sold pre-COVID. 

With nearly all of Byron's economy tied to tourism, hospitality and the creative arts, Byron mayor Simon Richardson said the pandemic has delivered a "triple whammy". 

"It is really dangerous times for us," he said. 

Hotel bookings looked healthy for summer, but if the town doesn't get that "fattening" he feared it could "lurch into real danger". 

Hotel owner Christian Millett said Byron had been a stable market all year long, in the past. But after coronavirus shut down weddings and festivals, Mr Millett said he would not have been been able to justify keeping his doors open outside of school holidays if he wasn't receiving JobKeeper.....

Taylor Fry's analysis found smaller firms in retail, hospitality, manufacturing and construction sectors are especially dependent on JobKeeper to retain their staff...... 

When the tourism dried up, it affected the rest of the region with "all the pork and tomatoes, macadamia and the mueslis which aren't being bought".

Cr Richardson said there was a "false sense of affluence" associated with Byron because of its multimillion-dollar beach houses and movie-star residents like Chris Hemsworth. 

"For every $10 million house at Wattegos Beach there are 10 homes that are in some of the poorest areas in NSW," he said. 

Four areas in the LGA are among the most disadvantaged 20 per cent in Australia, and two are among the most affluent..... 

Rents are also high, and Cr Richardson said he has seen more people couch surfing after losing their jobs. A shopkeeper said his landlord wanted to restore rents to pre-COVID levels after providing discounts earlier: "In this time, we can't afford the full rent for the premises ... because there are 60 to 40 per cent fewer tourists." 

Taylor Fry's principal Alan Greenfield said without JobKeeper he was nervous about the future of regional tourist towns, especially if restrictions on travel continued. "If locals can't see a future where they live, they might be inclined to move away." 

Simon Westaway, the executive director of the Australian Tourism Industry Council, said the impact of COVID-19 on his 10,000 members had been "diabolical". Unlike other industries, it had been hard for tourist operators to "pivot" to other business. 

Even if people could travel, the impact of continuing uncertainty over jobs and rising mortgage stress – estimated to grow to $200 billion from $60 billon now – meant visitors were not necessarily buying the most expensive "smoothie". 

"You put all these figures together, and you go wowie kazowie, who is in a mindset to have a decent holiday? Let alone if you are allowed out [by governments]. " 

Although business was down now, surf school director and founder of Let's Go Surfing Brenda Miley said Byron was an aspirational place that will bounce back. "Everyone wants to go there. It is well worn trek from Bondi to Byron, and that all came together last school holidays." 

 She thinks it will be booked out next summer if government restrictions on travel aren't in place. "People who were planning to go skiing in Colorado or France are so happy to go to Byron and surf for a week or two," she said.

Percentage of NSW Northern Rivers Businesses relying on JobKeeper Payments by Local Government Area - as of 22 July 2020 

  • Byron 60.39%
  • Tweed 47.79%
  • Ballina 39.56%
  • Clarence Valley 34.52%
  • Lismore 35.05%
  • Richmond Valley 27.45%
  • Kyogle 21.3%

Monday, 29 June 2020

ECONOMIC STATE OF PLAY 2020: "Under these latest forecasts Australia’s economy next year would be 0.7% smaller than it was last year. That is the first time since 1983 that our economy would be smaller than it was two years earlier."


The Guardian, June 2020:



Since the virus hit there has been a belief, maybe a hope, that this was just a momentary thing. 


Sure, the fall would be sharp and deep, but the recovery would be fast coming. 

You could hear it in the talk of “snap back” from the prime minister and treasurer. 

There was almost a sense that this recession is not really a recession – because this was driven by health, not the economy. The underlying economy, this argument went, was solid (the foundations were strong!), and thus once those restrictions were dispensed with, we would be back as good as ever. 

The problem was that the foundations were not strong (productivity growth, household incomes and the domestic private sector were all flat-lining). Just because the causes of this recession were unusual does not alter the fact that all recessions bring with them massive job losses and a fall in production. 

And this recession is the worst we have seen since the Great Depression. 

This week the IMF issued a revised set of estimates for GDP growth this year and the next. And there was some good news to be had.....

In April the IMF forecast our GDP this year would fall by 6.7%; now it estimates it will “only” fall by 4.5%. 

Unfortunately though, the treasurer neglected to point out that, other than Malaysia, Australia had the biggest growth forecast downgrade for 2021. 

In April the IMF estimated our economy would “bounce” back in 2021 with 6.1% growth; now it sees just 4%. 

Overall, the IMF’s changed estimates are such that they expect our economy at the end of 2021 to be virtually the same size they were expecting it to be in April. Hardly a ringing endorsement that government policies are doing better than expected. 

What this means is we need to very quickly disabuse ourselves of the notion that the economy will “snap back” in 2021 and all will be well. 

Under these latest forecasts Australia’s economy next year would be 0.7% smaller than it was last year. That is the first time since 1983 that our economy would be smaller than it was two years earlier. 

But even that rather hides the impact. 

In October the IMF estimated that for the next five years our economy would grow by around 2.5% each year. That is pretty miserable growth, but it was largely in line with the average since the GFC. 

But now, even with these new and improved estimates for our economy, by the end of next year we are still tracking to be 5.3% below where we were expected to be. 

That is the equivalent of around $105bn less being produced – or roughly the total amount produced in a year by the entire manufacturing industry. 

That is a chasm of economic waste. 

If the economy was to keep growing at (a very strong) 4%, it would take us until 2025 to get back level with where we were expected to be before the virus. If it grows at the more realistic 3% from 2022 onwards, we will not get back on par until well into the 2030s. [my yellow highlighting]

The debate very much needs to shift from the language being used in January and February. 

Forget “fundamentals being strong” and “sensible budget management”. It was spin then; it is just embarrassingly irrelevant now. 

We are in a deep recession and the political and policy debate needs to recognise this fact.


Monday, 22 June 2020

Prevalence of amphetamine possession and/or use in the NSW Northern Rivers region


On 7 May 2019 The Sydney Morning Herald reported that:

Amphetamine possession in NSW has risen by 250 per cent over the past decade….
The alarming statistics, which also showed possession in some parts of the state had skyrocketed by up to 1000 per cent, were presented on Tuesday at the special commission of inquiry into the drug ice commissioned by Premier Gladys Berejiklian.

The following statistics indicate the prevelance of amphetamine use and possession in the NSW Northern Rivers region in 2020.


NSW RECORDED CRIME STATISTICS APRIL 2019-MARCH 2020

Tweed LGA:

Possession &/or use of amphetamines rate per 100,000 head of population – 150.9

Byron Bay LGA:

Possession &/or use of amphetamines rate per 100,000 head of population – 147.5

Clarence Valley LGA:

Possession &/or use of amphetamines rate per 100,000 head of population – 135.

Lismore City LGA:

Possession &/or use of amphetamines rate per 100,000 head of population – 120.9

Richmond Valley LGA:

Possession &/or use of amphetamines rate per 100,000 head of population – 111.1

Ballina LGA:

Possession &/o use of amphetamines rate per 100,000 head of population – 79.6

Kyogle LGA:

Possession &/or use of amphetamines rate per 100,000 head of population – 45.1

The two year trend and annual percentage change for all seven Northern Rivers local government areas appears to be stable.

By way of general comparison, Coffs Harbour LGA on the mid-North Coast had a possession &/or use of amphetamines rate per 100,000 head of population of 177.7, Port Macquarie-Hastings LGA a rate of 132.3, Newcastle LGA 127.4, Sydney LGA 363.8 (up 25.4% on two year trend & annual percentage change) and New South Wales 103.1 (up 12.8% on two year trend & annual percentage change). 

After the COVID-19 global pandenic was declared on 11 March 2020 the six week period after social distancing was imposed (15 March – 26 April, 2020) saw overall drug possession fall by 4% in New South Wales.

Note:

Rate per 100,000 head of population does not necessarily represent a high number of incidents. For example, in 2019 the Clarence Valley possession &/or use of amphetamines rate per 100,000 head of population was 147.2 based on a total of 76 recorded incidents.

Saturday, 4 April 2020

Monday, 30 March 2020

COVID-19 confirmed cases count for Australia, states and territories from 29 March 2020


THIS POST IS NO LONGER UPDATING

Cumulative totals of confirmed COVID-19 infections across Australia, taken from official federal, state and territory sources and updated daily. 

Dates of the month are those of official departmental media releases and do not always reflect the day on which any confirmed infection increase occurred. The lag when it does occur is usually less than 24 hours.

Australia
  • 3,984 confirmed COVID-19 cases 29 March 2020 
  • 4,250 confirmed COVID-19 cases 30 March 2020 (increase of 266 cases)
  • 4,558 confirmed COVID-19 cases 31 March 2020 (increase of 308 cases)
  • 4,864 confirmed COVID-19 cases 1 April 2020 (increase of 306 cases)
  • 5,137 confirmed COVID-19 cases 2 April 2020 (increase of 273 cases)
  • 5,361 confirmed COVID-19 cases 3 April 2020 (increase of 224 cases)
  • 5,550 confirmed COVID-19 cases 4 April 2020 (increase of 189 cases)
  • 5,693 confirmed COVID-19 cases 4 April 2020 (increase of 143 cases)
  • 5,800 confirmed COVID-19 cases 6 April 2020 (increase 107 cases)*
  • 5,844 confirmed COVID-19 cases 7 April 2020, with 44 deaths 
*  Estimates only
QLD
  • 656 confirmed COVID-19 cases 29 March 2020 (increase of 31 cases)
  • 689 confirmed COVID-19 cases 30 March 2020 (increase of 33 cases)
  • 743 confirmed COVID-19 cases 31 March 2020 (increase of 55 cases)
  • 781 confirmed COVID-19 cases 1 April 2020 (increase of 38 cases)
  • 835 confirmed COVID-19 cases 2 April 2020 (increase of 54 cases)
  • 873 confirmed COVID-19 cases 3 April 2020 (increase of 39 cases)
  • 900 confirmed COVID-19 cases 4 April 2020 (increase of 27 cases)
  • 907 confirmed COVID-19 cases 5 April 2020 (increase of 9 cases)
  • 921  confirmed COVID-19 cases 6 April 2020 (increase of 14 cases)
NSW
  • 1,791 confirmed COVID-19 cases 29 March 2020 (increase of 174 cases)
  • 1,918 confirmed COVID-19 cases 30 March 2020 (increase of 127 cases)
  • 2,032 confirmed COVID-19 cases 31 March 2020 (increase of 96 cases)
  • 2,182 confirmed COVID-19 cases 1 April 2020 (increase of 105 cases)
  • 2,298 confirmed COVID-19 cases 2 April 2020 (increase of 116 cases)
  • 2,389 confirmed COVID-19 cases 3 April 2020 (increase of 91 cases)
  • 2,493 confirmed COVID-19 cases 4 April 2020 (increase of 104 cases)
  • 2,580 confirmed COVID-19 cases 5 April 2020 (increase of 87 cases)
  • 2,637 confirmed COVID-19 cases 6 April 2020 (increase of 57 cases)
ACT
  • 77 confirmed COVID-19 cases 29 March 2020 (increase of 6 cases)
  • 78 confirmed COVID-19 cases 30 March 2020 (increase of 1 case)
  • 80 confirmed COVID-19 cases 31 March 2020 (increase of 2 cases)
  • 84  confirmed COVID-19 cases 1 April 2020 (increase of 4 cases)*
  • 87 confirmed COVID-19 cases 2 April 2020 (increase of 3 cases)*
  • 91 confirmed COVID-19 cases 3 April 2020 (increase of 4 cases)
  • 93 confirmed COVID-19 cases 4 April 2020 (increase of 2 cases) 
  • 96 confirmed COVID-19 cases 5 April 2020 (increase of 3 cases) 
  • 96 confirmed COVID-19 cases 6 April 2020 (no increase overnight) 
* numbers being reassessed due to false positive tests

VIC
  • 769 confirmed COVID-19 cases 29 March 2020 (increase of 31 cases)
  • 821 confirmed COVID-19 cases 30 March 2020 (increase of 52 cases)
  • 917 confirmed COVID-19 cases 31 March 2020 (increase of 96 cases)
  • 968 confirmed COVID-19 cases 1 April 2020 (increase of 51 cases)
  • 1,036 confirmed COVID-19 cases 2 April 2020 (increase of 68 cases)
  • 1,084 confirmed COVID-19 cases 3 April 2020 (increase of 49 cases)
  • 1,115 confirmed COVID-19 cases 4 April 2020 (increase of 30 cases)
  • 1,135 confirmed COVID-19 cases 5 April 2020 (increase of 20 cases)
  • 1,158  confirmed COVID-19 cases 6 April 2020 (increase 23 of cases)*
*  Estimates only

TAS
  • 66 confirmed COVID-19 cases 29 March 2020 (increase of 4 cases)
  • 69 confirmed COVID-19 cases 30 March 2020 (increase of 3 cases)
  • 69 confirmed COVID-19 cases 31 March 2020 (no increase overnight)
  • 71 confirmed COVID-19 cases 1 April 2020 (increase of 2 cases)
  • 74 confirmed COVID-19 cases 2 April 2020 (increase of 2 cases)
  • 80 confirmed COVID-19 cases 3 April 2020 (increase of 6 cases)
  • 80 confirmed COVID-19 cases 4 April 2020 (no increase overnight)
  • 86 confirmed COVID-19 cases 5 April 2020 (increase of 4 cases)
  • 89 confirmed COVID-19 cases 5 6 April 2020 (increase of 3 cases)
SA
  • 299 confirmed COVID-19 cases 29 March 2020 (increase of 12 cases)
  • 305 confirmed COVID-19 cases 30 March 2020 (increase of 6 cases)
  • 337 confirmed COVID-19 cases 31 March 2020 (increase of 32 cases)
  • 367 confirmed COVID-19 cases 1 April 2020 (increase of 30 cases)
  • 385 confirmed COVID-19 cases 2 April 2020 (increase of 18 cases)
  • 396 confirmed COVID-19 cases 3 April 2020 (increase of 11 cases)
  • 407 confirmed COVID-19 cases 4 April 2020 (increase of 11 cases)
  • 409 confirmed COVID-19 cases 5 April 2020 (increase of 2 cases)
  • 411 confirmed COVID-19 cases 6 April 2020 (increase of 2 cases)
WA
  • 311 confirmed COVID-19 cases 29 March 2020 (increase of 33 cases)
  • 355 confirmed COVID-19 cases 30 March 2020 (increase of 44 cases)
  • 364 confirmed COVID-19 cases 31 March 2020 (increase of 9 cases)
  • 392 confirmed COVID-19 cases 1 April 2020 (increase of 28 cases)
  • 400 confirmed COVID-19 cases 2 April 2020 (increase of 8 cases)
  • 422 confirmed COVID-19 cases 3 April 2020 (increase of 22 cases)
  • 436 confirmed COVID-19 cases 4 April 2020 (increase of 14 cases
  • 453 confirmed COVID-19 cases 5 April 2020 (increase of 17 cases)
  • 460 confirmed COVID-19 cases 6 April 2020 (increase of 7 cases)
NT
  • 15 confirmed COVID-19 cases 29 March 2020 (no increase overnight)
  • 15 confirmed COVID-19 cases 30 March 2020 (no increase overnight)
  • 17 confirmed COVID-19 cases 31 March 2020 (increase of 2 cases)
  • 19 confirmed COVID-19 cases 1 April 2020 (increase of 2 cases)
  • 22 confirmed COVID-19 cases 2 April 2020 (increase of 3 cases)
  • 26 confirmed COVID-19 cases 3 April 2020 (increase of 4 cases)
  • 26 confirmed COVID-19 cases 4 April 2020 (no increase overnight)
  • 27 confirmed COVID-19 cases 4 April 2020 (increase of 1 case)
  • 28  confirmed COVID-19 cases 6 April 2020 (increase of 2 cases)
NSW Northern Rivers Region
  • confirmed COVID-19 cases 16 March 2020
  • confirmed COVID-19 cases 18 March 2020
  • confirmed COVID-19 cases 22 March 2020
  • 7 confirmed COVID-19 cases 23 March 2020
  • 17 confirmed COVID-19 cases 24 March 2020
  • 22 confirmed COVID-19 cases 26 March 2020
  • 25 confirmed COVID-19 cases 27 March 2020
  • 27 confirmed COVID-19 cases 30 March 2020
  • 38 confirmed COVID-19 cases 31 March 2020
  • 42 confirmed COVID-19 cases 1 April 2020 - Kyogle 0 cases, Richmond Valley 0 cases, Ballina 4 cases, Lismore 5 cases, Clarence Valley 8 cases, Tweed 12 cases, Byron Bay 13 cases.
  • 44 confirmed COVID-19 cases 2 April 2020 
  • 45 confirmed COVID-19 cases 3 April 2020
  • 46 confirmed COVID-19 caes 5 April 2020 - Kyogle 0 cases, Richmond Valley 4 cases, Ballina 4 cases, Lismore 5  cases, Clarence Valley 8 cases, Tweed 13 cases, Byron Bay 13 cases.
  • 47 confirmed COVID-19 cases 6 April 2020

Wednesday, 25 March 2020

Because the number of graphs are proliferating in mainstream and social media, here are two official Australian Government graphs


Because the number of graphs are proliferating in mainstream and social media, here are two official Australian Government graphs.


This graph shows the number of confirmed cases by notification date. Interpret the most recently reported new cases shown in the graph with caution as there can be delays in reporting.

Age breakdown as of 24 March 2020.

As of 24 March 2019 there were 2,136 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Australia and 8 have died from this novel viral infection. More than 143,000 COVID-19 tests had been conducted across Australia, according to the Australian Dept. of Health.